I wished you called me one morning, like you used to do, and told me all of your day, and work problems, and all the new food you’ve tried. I wished. 

MEDITATION #1: OCEAN LIFE

Love and creativity are like the ocean. When you are at the beach, outside the water, you can occasionally and (depending on the sea you’re at), see fish and marine life from the surface. It is beautiful, colorful, and abundant, and you don’t even have to submerge or take a swim to notice it. You can easily see it from above a pier or from the comfort of your parasol. For many people, that’s more than enough, it is fulfilling, miraculous, and genuinely speaking, enticing.  It is, sort to speak, love at first sight, instant gratification, or a constant and effective creative fix. Then, however, for those who know the Oceans and love the life inside of them, the surface is nothing but a bounded experience. They know, that even though the shallow waters host an incredible variety and beauty of animals and marine species, the real beauty and diversity exists only on the high seas or in the deep waters. These people understand that life in the deep waters is way beyond human imagination. Farther, way farther, more complex and therefore, richer than life on the shallow. It is precisely in those realms, of the deep and the high oceans, where life flourishes wildly and boundlessly. It is where our deepest fears, and our deepest aw coexist. Fishes, bacteria, plants, volcanoes, crustaceans, et al. flicker between dimensions and tear up apart the limits of our minds. We expand our human experience there, we catch the big fishes there. Some people go “all in” for the life offshore. They want to get to see and enjoy the fantastic, the illogical, the savage, the real. For some people, life ashore, is more than enough, little fish, little diversity, is what they want. In my opinion, those who love, really love the Ocean, wouldn’t think twice whether submerging or not into the darkness of the deep waters. Once again, from my perspective, those who thrust themselves to these waters, live a life a uncountable times more exciting and at the same time harder and longer to attain. It is a deep meditation, and as such, love and creativity alike. The deeper the merrier, then however, some people don’t love the ocean, they love the shores. (Though, they might as well ignore the diversity beneath their feet in the sand their standing on).  

tiarasofspanishmoss:

I think one of the hardest things about being a child whose a father who was in and out of prison was the judgment of other authority figures/adults. Not only did people go on and on with simplistic messages about how people end up in prison, they also told us to our faces that our family problems, our troubles in school and more were all the result of “a culture of failure” and (most of) our parents being unmarried. It was hard enough being taught to build a relationship with my father over prison visits and letters, but the way we were taught to view our families and ourselves because of generational incarceration was dangerous.

(via reagan-was-a-horrible-president)

Source sandandglass

Reblogged from sandandglass

micdotcom:

Here’s what the anti-discrimination speeches FIFA is making players read should really say

Amidst the last minute heroics and gravity-defying goals, people seem to have forgotten the brutal police crackdowns, rampant dislocation and erosion of social services that enabled the tournament’s “success.”
Blame FIFA, the sponsoring organization whose callous hypocrisy is matched only by its savvy in obscuring the damage it inflicts. Luckily, we have Australian illustrator David Squires to keep us honest.
Using the “anti-discrimination” text FIFA has players read before matches as an entry point, the artist has created a series of comic panels interpreting what these messages really mean.
Read more | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

Here’s what the anti-discrimination speeches FIFA is making players read should really say

Amidst the last minute heroics and gravity-defying goals, people seem to have forgotten the brutal police crackdowns, rampant dislocation and erosion of social services that enabled the tournament’s “success.”

Blame FIFA, the sponsoring organization whose callous hypocrisy is matched only by its savvy in obscuring the damage it inflicts. Luckily, we have Australian illustrator David Squires to keep us honest.

Using the “anti-discrimination” text FIFA has players read before matches as an entry point, the artist has created a series of comic panels interpreting what these messages really mean.

Read more | Follow micdotcom 

Reblogged from micdotcom